The Forced Trajectory Project

Nissa Tzun
March 25, 2019

Through 2019, ArtsEverywhere is working with Families United 4 Justice and the Forced Trajectory Project to co-produce a series of personal narratives by family members, in a small effort to create counter-narratives to those established by the media in collusion with law enforcement, and to encourage greater system transparency and accountability. Through text, photo, audio and video, these families are rewriting the narratives of their loved ones, facilitating a broader exchange, educating a wider base, and connecting thought to action.


Below is a three minute summary of the work that the Forced Trajectory Project (FTP) has been doing for the past ten years. To read a more detailed history written by one of FTP’s founders, please visit this link. To learn more about the recent Families United 4 Justice gathering in Oakland, read Nicolle Bennet’s piece Police Violence and the Art of Organizing.

Nissa Tzun

Nissa D. Tzun is the Project Founder & Editor-in-Chief of the Forced Trajectory Project (FTP). She is a multimedia artist specializing in illustration, graphic and web design, photography, film, public relations and investigative journalism. In 2009, She founded FTP, an independent media outlet that began as a long-term documentary project illuminating the narratives of families impacted by police violence. In 2014, Nissa supported the inception of Families United 4 Justice, a growing nationwide collective of families affected by police violence. Nissa currently serves as a family advocate, organizer and board member for FU4J. Nissa is a professor for the Hank Greenspun School of Journalism & Media Studies and is currently pursuing her Masters’ in Social Work and Journalism & Media Studies at UNLV.

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