Curse of Geography

German Andino
Alberto Arce
Sidd Joag
December 13, 2017

http://curseofgeography.artseverywhere.ca/

Curse of Geography is an on-going series of investigative projects focused on the relationship of geographic isolation or proximity on social justice, human rights and public policy in selected locations around the world. Our reports are produced in multi-media format and in partnership with artists, journalists, NGOs, academic and cultural institutions, and news outlets.

The first in this series focuses on La Mosquitia, the far eastern coast of Honduras. For most people in La Mosquitia, there are only two forms of gainful employment – lobster fishing and drug trafficking. 90% of the cocaine that ends up in the United States passes through this isolated and neglected corner of the world. 90% of the lobster harvested here arrives at the same destination. This coupled with corruption and the war on drugs has had adverse effects on the indigenous Miskito people. In May 2017, German Andino, Alberto Arce, and Sidd Joag traveled to the Mosquito Coast for three weeks to understand the situation more clearly.

A dynamic version of the piece on La Mosquitia can be accessed via the Curse of Geography website and the PDF can be downloaded here.

German Andino

German Andino

German Andino was born in 1984. He is a Honduran journalist.

Alberto Arce

Alberto Arce

Alberto Arce is a Knight Wallace Fellow at the University of Michigan. He joined the Associated Press (AP) in February 2012 as a correspondent in Honduras, where for several years he was the only foreign correspondent to report from Tegucigalpa. He later joined AP’s Mexico City bureau, where he continued to cover Central America before going to The New York Times as an editor. He has an Overseas press Club Award for best reporting on Latin America.

Sidd Joag

Sidd Joag

Sidd Joag is a visual artist, journalist and producer working on issues closely related to social inequality and human rights. He is also the Managing Editor at ArtsEverywhere.

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