Essays

ArtsEverywhere extends invitations to writers, artists, leaders, and critical thinkers in diverse fields and sectors. We create open spaces for dialogue about the value that the arts bring to all aspects of our communities and societies.

The Radical Education Workbook, Part 1: Challenging Imposed Curricula

Ultra-red, International 
Radical Education Forum, UK 

Republishing the Radical Education Workbook Introduction by Alessandra Pomarico The Radical Education Workbook was produced in 2010 by the Radical Education Forum and the art and political collective Ultra-red, at the onset of the movement against the austerity programme laid out at the time by the Coalition Government in Britain. Seven years later, with the neoliberal agenda openly and globally...

The Unbribables and the Risk of Dissent

Rena Rädle & Vladan Jeremić, Belgrade, Serbia 

The recent scandalous arrest of the Belgrade-based artist Vladan Jeremić, which happened in the Serbian capital at the re-opening of the Museum of Contemporary Art—after 10 years of closure—has angered the art world again. ArtsEverywhere recently published Jeremić‘s finely sharpened political drawings, and so we asked Jeremić and his accomplice Rena Rädle, a witness to the arrest, to analyze in...

Letters to Moth I

Ashon Crawley, Charlottesville, VA 

“The Lonely Letters” is an autobiofiction in which I attempt to think the relationship of quantum theory, mysticism, relationality, and blackness together by considering the sound and noise of Blackpentecostal spaces. Building on the work in Blackpentecostal Breath: The Aesthetics of Possibility—as the project began before and was written during and after the academic book project—the “The Lonely Letters” attempts...

Forced Trajectories: Creating Counter-Narratives to Police Violence

Nissa Tzun, Las Vegas 

Introduction Sidd Joag On June 16th, 2017, ArtsEverywhere was set to publish Nissa Tzun’s piece, “Forced Trajectories: Creating Counter-Narratives to Police Violence.” That evening, Officer Jeronimo Yanez was acquitted of the killing of Philando Castile in the outskirts of Saint Paul, Minnesota. Castile was sitting in the car with his girlfriend and her 4-year old daughter when he was shot...

Make problems everywhere

Fabiana Faleiros, Rio de Janeiro 

Viva the fat ones, Viva the brown ones I want to be a woman without models to imitate To be a faggot you have to be brave Disobedience In spite of you I will be happy I don’t carry your semen I vomit your humiliation Woman, not submissive nor devoted Free, pretty and crazy Indigenous, whores and lesbians together Rebellious...

Ukraine’s Battle with Russia Moves to the Classroom

Ian Bateson, Bakhmut, Ukraine 

This article was originally published by Coda Story. The bell rings for the end of lessons at Bakhmut’s School Number 18 in the Donetsk region of eastern Ukraine, and children come pouring out of the building. Historically, Russian has been the dominant language here. It is a short drive to the frontline of the country’s 3-year-old war with Russian-backed separatists,...

From Taxes to Yemen

Niki Singleton, New York City 

This piece was drawn out of the utter frustration I’ve felt over the last two years, while watching Yemen continue to degrade into a famine-stricken, disease-ridden country. A quarter of Yemen’s population, seven million people, are on the brink of starvation, 3.3 million children are acutely malnourished, and thousands have been killed as a result of a Saudi-led, American and...

Centering Indigenous Bodies, Thought and Practice

Aïcha Diallo, Berlin 

The gathering Under the Mango Tree — Sites of Learning, that was organized by aneducation of documenta 14 and ifa, acted as an open forum to explore the notion and practice of education globally. Artist Duane Linklater, who participated in the gathering with the project Wood Land School, met with Aïcha Diallo. The artist from Canada of Omaskêko Cree descent discusses...

Open Letter from documenta 14 artists:
On the emancipatory possibility of decentered exhibitions

documenta 14 Artists, Athens & Kassel 

We the undersigned artists, writers, musicians, and researchers who participated in various chapters of the current documenta 14– Exhibition, Parliament of Bodies, South as a State of Mind, Listening Space, Keimena, Studio 14, An Education, EMST collection, and Every Time A Ear di Soun– wish to share some thoughts about the possibilities and potential of documenta. Firstly, we acknowledge those...

Belonging as a Cultural Right

Arlene Goldbard, Lamy, New Mexico 

This article originally appeared in the Journal of Othering & Belonging and is reprinted with permission of the author and the publishers at the Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society. The US Department of Arts and Culture (USDAC) may sound like a government agency, but unlike the National Endowment for the Arts, it can’t be eliminated with a pen...

documenta 14 team speaks out about value production of the arts

documenta 14 artistic director & team, Kassel & Athens 

Editors’ Note: ArtsEverywhere expresses its solidarity and support to the curatorial and management team of documenta 14, a multi-layered mega-exhibition that raised complex and, at times, controversial questions. In Kassel and Athens, documenta 14 frames critical public debates on relevant issues of our times, and proves the arts essential in the exercise of questioning and re-imagining our society and cultural institutions. Recently the German media reported on and politicized the alleged cost-overruns of the program,...

Against Simple Answers: The Queer-Communist Theory of Evald Ilyenkov and Alexander Suvorov

Georgy Mamedov & Oksana Shatalova, Bishkek 

The following essay was written in today’s Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan, one of the Central Asian republics of the former USSR. It was translated by Giuliano Vivaldi, and was written by our colleagues, Georgy Mamedov, Oksana Shatalova. Cultural activists and organizers, Mamedov and Shatalova initiated a hub for radical cultural studies named STAB (School of Theory and Activism –...

Performing the Struggle: Chapter Three
Scars, Giant Face, Ferocious Breakdance, and Other Learning Props to Perform the Struggle: A Play as Remembered by a Participant

N.O. aka Aliosha Pantalone, St. Petersburg 

This is chapter three of three. For the first chapter in the series, please click here. For the second chapter in the series, please click here. Cast: Abimbola (Abimbola Odugbesan) Nigerian freedom fighter, dedicates most of his time to self-organized refugee groups like Lampedusa in Hamburg, Here to Participate (program for Refugee teachers), and Silent University Hamburg. He is keen...

Performing the Struggle: Chapter Two
Away from Home in Lecce

Christina Thomopoulos, Athens 

This is chapter two of three. For the first chapter in the series, please click here. For the third chapter in the series, please click here. Foreign Postcards: A Series of Rituals around Language, Memory, and Music When was the first time you remember hearing the word “foreigner”? What happened? From whom did you first hear this word? How did you feel...

Performing the Struggle: Chapter One

Alessandra Pomarico, New York City & Lecce, Italy 

Just as the way we perform changes, so should our sense of “voice.” In our everyday lives we speak differently to diverse audiences. We communicate best by choosing that way of speaking that is informed by the particularity and uniqueness of whom we are speaking to and with. […] The engaged voice must never be fixed and absolute but always...

detail of THREAD by Janet Rosenberg & Studio

Artists in the Field: A rare History of Artistic Interventions and Transformative Actions

Mike Young, Toronto 

What do a conceptual longhouse, an ephemeral dining pavilion, an opera singer in the woods and a photographer in a river all have in common? They’re all rare sitings. Over the past thirteen years, artists have been working alongside biologists at the rare Charitable Research Reserve, near Blair, Ontario. The landscape at rare is one of great diversity, including rolling,...

The Effect of Iteration on Urban Form, Part II: Iteration in an Ecosystem

Mathieu Hélie, Montréal 

In the Lille citadel example that we saw in part one, we could observe a building technology achieving greater complexity over time, as each iteration survived or failed a new series of tests. Another aspect of the complexity of a geometric process seen in the Lille citadel example is its contextual adaptation. The shape of the city and the surrounding...

The Effect of Iteration on Urban Form, Part I: Fractals and the Creation of Complexity

Mathieu Hélie, Montréal 

Part two of this essay can be found here In a previous article I proposed that we adopt a perspective on preservation that allowed for transformation and change of what is to be preserved. This type of change has a more precise definition: iteration. To iterate means to “cover the same ground twice”, using feedback from the result of previous...

Dissident Geographies: São Paulo, Athens, and Beyond

Jarri Castro, Athens 
Marta Echaves, Madrid 

An event called Queer City is, per se, an invitation to inhabit the oxymoron as an epistemological position. Can a queer city exist? What would it look like? Who would be the good queer citizen? Mavi asks a spectator to help her close her necklace. Michelle draws a square made of sugar on the floor, her back towards us. At...

In Ghana, Visions of Queer Friendship and Love

M. Neelika Jayawardane, New York 

This article is part of a series produced in collaboration with Aperture magazine and Contemporary And, coinciding with Aperture’s summer 2017 issue, “Platform Africa.” In his series Just Like Us (2016), the photographer Eric Gyamfi explores the contradictions of queer life in Ghana. His work chronicles what it means to be “other” in a nation of people who have a remarkably well-defined sense...

Reclaiming Cartography, Photography, and Colonial Imagery

Kristine Jordan, New York 

Fifty-eight years ago, the Malagasy Republic was declared an autonomous state within an association of countries known as the French Community. Much like other nations that fought for independence well into the second half of the 20th century, elements of colonial power dynamics are evident in Madagascar’s modern cultural productions. Using images of these cultural productions and printed archives from...

The Game of Non-Distinction

Nikita Kadan, Kyiv 

As an ideological reaction to the ongoing invasion of Russian troops, separatist attacks in Eastern Ukraine, and the annexation of Crimea in 2014, and as a gesture towards establishing a new ideology to replace the Soviet one, the so-called Decommunization Laws were approved by the president and parliament of Ukraine in 2015. This law on a very symbolic level practically...

Forget the “Event”: Contemporary Radical Thought, the Legacy of 1917 and post-Soviet Politics

Alexei Penzin, London/Moscow 
Chto Delat, St. Petersberg 

The editors of ArtsEverywhere recommend that you read Nikolay Oleynikov’s “Ways of Seeing the New Russian Colonialisms: Writing on and from Post-Soviet Territories” for an introduction to the history of Tsarist, Soviet, and Post-Soviet Russia. Oleynikov’s investigation into the connections between past and present forms of imperialism and colonialism in post-Soviet territories offers a broader context within which to read...

Gentrifying the Commons // Commoning Gentrification

L. Grace Weber, Minneapolis 

This essay was originally published in the journal (Un)usual Business vol.1.  View/Download the issue. Resisting Enclosure through Creative Commoning in Kanaleneiland Lively District: With the development of the renewal area Kanaleneiland aims to transform the currently rundown outdoor area into a high-quality, vibrant metropolitan area. Additionally, a substantial and varied program will be integrated, which ultimately will result in intense and vivid use...

I’m With Her

Niki Singleton, New York City 

Recently the US Congress passed a healthcare bill to repeal and replace Obamacare with one of the most disturbingly elitist, barbarian and almost Palaeozoic pieces of legislation I’ve ever heard of. Americans in New York are horrified and the average person isn’t sure what else to do these days but constantly protest every backward, misogynist, racist, elitist and uncaring bill...

Haawiyat: A Syrian Comic for Syrian Children

Monica Rodriguez, New York City 

After fleeing Syria, a nation badly bloodied by civil war, refugees are finding themselves trapped in migratory limbo for long stretches of time as they await placement in foreign, and often unwelcoming, lands. Of the staggering 4.9 million displaced Syrians currently residing in refugee camps, nearly half are children. Syrian children are forced to suffer new traumas within the camps...

The Emerging Indie Music Industry in Saudi Arabia

Melody Chan, New York City 

During his performance for a group of students in New York in April, Saudi musician Diya Azzony prompted the audience to ask him questions about anything from his musical technique to his life story to his politics. This open exchange was exactly what Azzony hoped to facilitate during his four-day U.S. tour this April. “A lot of people have questions...

Activating Humanities Knowledge: Human Rights Pedagogy and Community-Based Education

Ajay Heble, Guelph 

The following is an excerpt from Ajay Heble’s Introduction to Classroom Action: Human Rights, Critical Activism, and Community-Based Education, a book (edited by Heble, with chapters by his former students) published by University of Toronto Press in Spring 2017. For more information, or to order the book, please visit University of Toronto Press. The Challenge: Calling All Dreamers Students in the...

A 15 Year History of Radical Hosting: From Wooloo to Human Hotel

Martin Rosengaard, Copenhagen 

2011, NEW YORK CITY: OCCUPY WALL STREET On Saturday, the 29th of October 2011, the first snowstorm hit New York City and Occupy Wall Street. My son was ten months old back then and we’d been spending much time at the occupied Zuccotti Park in the previous weeks since the occupation began. He would sleep or look on from his...

Open Casket

Sarah Schulman, New York City 

Controversy engulfed the Whitney Biennial recently over the inclusion of Dana Schutz’s “Open Casket”, an abstract painting that depicts the violently mutilated body of Emmett Till who was murdered by two white men in Mississippi in 1955 after he was falsely accused of whistling at a white woman, Carolyn Bryant. On April 10, 2017 the Whitney hosted a debate titled “Perspectives on Race...

The Spectres of Munich

Ilya Budraitskis, Moscow 

This essay is the first in a series entitled Ways of Seeing the New Russian Colonialisms: Writing on and from Post-Soviet Territories, curated by Nikolay Oleynikov for ArtsEverywhere. A series description and full list of essays can be found here. The Spectres of Munich The Official Language of Russia: reading between the lines by Ilya Budraitskis, accompanied with artwork by Vladan Jeremić,...

Ways of Seeing New Colonialisms: Writing on and from Post-Soviet Territories

Nikolay Oleynikov, St. Petersburg 

Summary How can we analyse Russia’s renewed colonialism and global expansionism that affects the geopolitical tectonic shifts of today?  Is Putin the successor of the USSR or of Tsarist Russia? How can we read the imperial language being imposed with the annexation of Crimea in 2014, the ongoing warfare on Ukrainian territories, and the attacks in Syria in 2016? We...

The City as Wave-Trough in the Image Flood

Vilém Flusser, Aix-en-Provence 

Translated, with an introduction by Phil Gochenour. By permission of the University of Chicago Press. While theorists such as Niklas Luhmann, Norbert Bolz, and Friedrich Kittler have begun to rise in prominence, thanks in large part to translations of major works, scant attention has been focused on Vilém Flusser, of whom Kittler wrote, “while media studies institutes have begun to...

Can a mestizo asshole speak?

Jota Mombaça, Natown, São Paulo, & Athens 

A collection of essays, artistic contributions, and two inserted zines, Queer City, a reader was developed as part of an 18-month inquiry in São Paulo. Initiated by Lanchonete.org and ArtsEverywhere/Musagetes, the Queer City program was a broad collective inquiry into how can we understand the contemporary city through a queer, intersectional, non-normative lens. The program included a series of encounters, dinners,...

Notes on Language: At the Foot of W̱MIEŦEN

Tim Lilburn, Victoria, British Columbia 
Philip Kevin Paul, W̱SÁNEĆ Nation, Vancouver Island 

ArtsEverywhere asked poets Tim Lilburn and Philip Kevin Paul to write about their experiences as a student (Lilburn) and teacher (Paul) of SENĆOŦEN, the language of the W̱SÁNEĆ—the original tongue of the Saanich Peninsula. Tim Lilburn Behind the shed where I read and think, a ferned cliff, its Garry oak, and Native plum hold language as pitchers hold water. Some of this speech,...

Radical Pedagogy is NOT

Alessandra Pomarico, New York City & Lecce, Italy 
N.O. aka Aliosha Pantalone, St. Petersburg 

Part one: To no list Foreword by Alessandra Pomarico (inspired by many). It was a real struggle to define, in a 10 minute text, “the partisan No” that originates and informs the experience of Free Home University—an ongoing, experimental, open-ended pedagogical process—while being immersed in one of our sessions: 25 people from around the world living/learning together, with no time...

Queer Vegan Manifesto

Rasmus Simonsen, Copenhagen 

A collection of essays, artistic contributions, and two inserted zines, Queer City, a reader was developed as part of an 18-month inquiry in São Paulo. Initiated by Lanchonete.org and ArtsEverywhere/Musagetes, the Queer City program was a broad collective inquiry into how can we understand the contemporary city through a queer, intersectional, non-normative lens. The program included a series of encounters,...

The Enjoyment of the Pariah: Technologies to exist at the margins [of the State]

Sabrina Duran, São Paulo 

A collection of essays, artistic contributions, and two inserted zines, Queer City, a reader was developed as part of an 18-month inquiry in São Paulo. Initiated by Lanchonete.org and ArtsEverywhere/Musagetes, the Queer City program was a broad collective inquiry into how can we understand the contemporary city through a queer, intersectional, non-normative lens. The program included a series of encounters,...

I drag you with me: ancestry and contemporary practice

Edgar Calel, Guatemala City 
Raphael Daibert, São Paulo 

I drag you with me: ancestry and contemporary practice (a conversation between Raphael Daibert and Edgar Calel) Edgar Calel came to São Paulo for a three-month residency that extended to six. Through a partnership between the Latin American artist residency platform Lastro and the artist-led cultural platform Lanchonete.org, Calel was able to travel all around Brazil. During his time in...

Deep Listening at the End of the World

Jeannette Hicks, Guelph 

Deep Listening at the End of the World[1] I’m sitting beside the ocean at the end of the world singing with a wave. A rhythmic low whoosh, and a building sigh–             hhhhhwAAAAAAaaaannsss                                     ssshhaaaaaaaaAAAAAAAnnng……. Around me, perched...

Learning to learn in a context of war

Edgardo García, Oaxaca 

Ecoversities Gathering of Kindred Folk Re-imagining Higher Education Introduction by Kelly Tamey and Udi Mandel, co-hosts of the unconference with Manish Jain There is a knowledge movement slowly building all over the world, often under the radar of the media (mainstream and otherwise). This knowledge movement is an emerging network of—let’s call them Ecoversities—people and communities reclaiming their local knowledge...

Really Useful Knowledge

What, How & for Whom, Zagreb 

The following text originally appeared in the catalogue published on the occasion of the exhibition Really Useful Knowledge, curated by What, How & for Whom/WHW and organized and produced by the Museo Nacional Centro De Arte Contemporanea Reina Sofía. The catalogue offers a further occasion to the contributing artists to reflect on the intrinsic pedagogical dimension of their work—in some...

Insurgent Learning and Convivial Research: Universidad de la Tierra, Califas

Manuel Callahan, San Jose 

Insurgent Learning and Convivial Research: Universidad de la Tierra, Califas[1] Knowledge production has increasingly become central to emancipatory projects. More and more people in struggle recognize the importance of learning and research as an essential part of movement and also an essential part of those moments of the future in the present across the globe. Alongside the serial protests and...

Qalandiya International — A Palestinian Biennial

Gian Spina, Athens 

the dove’s collar a star abandoned on the roof and a winding alley leading to the port This sea is mine This sea air is mine —Mahmoud Darwish1   In Palestine, the impossibility of artistic freedom and the denial of freedom to move within one’s own country conspire as an everyday reality. The colonial project, with its settlements and army,...

The Tangled Histories of Disconnected Places

Lucia Nhamo, Harare 

This interview of artist Lucia Nhamo, conducted by Aïcha Diallo, originally appeared at ContemporaryAnd.com. Lucia Nhamo was awarded the Goethe/Lanchonete residency prize at Bamako Encounters in 2015. The Goethe Institut and Musagetes/ArtsEverywhere supported the juried prize of a two-month residency for an artist from Bamako Encounters with Lanchonete.org in São Paulo. The residency prize is awarded to a female artist whose work...

Don McKay on Defamiliarization

Andrew Vowles, Guelph 

Don McKay was out raven-watching one day in New Brunswick a number of years ago. Before moving there from Ontario, he hadn’t observed ravens intimately, so they hadn’t yet become invisible for him in the way that commonplace things and creatures — even people — might and often do. One particular raven he spotted on his way home that day...

In The Cracks of Learning (Situating Us)

Alessandra Pomarico, New York City & Lecce, Italy 

As a preamble, I’d like to clarify that every­thing I attempt to contribute in the following text on the subject of pedagogy is a recollection of ideas that have been collectively produced and experienced through convivial gatherings, dialogues, inquiries, critical reflec­tions, readings, and actions with many friends with whom I experimented in various processes of creating communities of learners.[1] From each...

This Land is MY Land

Niki Singleton, New York City 

I drew this comic illustration on the cover of the New York Times Magazine after watching a video of Alt-Right supporters in the US vigorously hailing Trump in genuine Nazi style on Youtube after the US Election. White Nationalism is on the rise globally and has just been given a strong voice in the incoming US Government with Donald Trump’s...

The Communicative Ecology of Artist Rights

Sidd Joag, New York City 

Even as the relationship between the fields of arts, culture and human rights becomes more defined, the global community of organizations, networks and civil society initiatives working at that intersection, advocating for artists and defending free expression remains a relatively small, tight-knit group. However, despite existing connectivity, there is a need for more streamlined news and information loops, partnered content...

Relocating: Emad Tayefeh

Sidd Joag, New York City 

It cost Emad Tayefeh $10,000 to bribe Iranian border guards for safe passage to Turkey, $2,500 of which was financed by the advocacy organization Freedom House. While living as a refugee in Istanbul he paid $4,700 for rent, $3,000 for food, and $600 for local transportation over the course of a year. After receiving humanitarian parole status from the U.S....

Nasty Grrrl Baby (2016)

Niki Singleton, New York City 

I think most people living in the United States are incredibly sick of this never-ending election season. The sickening, overt misogyny we are subjected to on a regular basis, which is perpetuated through the media, is particularly troubling. Why in 2016 do we have a presidential candidate that wants to upend hard won abortion rights, has been caught on tape...

Ideology On Ice

Robert Atkins, San Francisco 

The American Dream, a four-ton, 30-foot-long, ice sculpture by LigoranoReese, is the most recent of the artist duo’s Melted Away series and the molten heart of its American Dream Project. It is also a Trojan Horse: Its straightforward display of a familiar concept conceals a rare capacity to elicit complex reactions and intense emotions from viewers, at the same time...

In/Visible Series: What is the role of women in the production of information and knowledge?

Another Africa, Vancouver 

In spring 2016, Another Africa launched In/Visible Voices of Women, a long-term publication project. Conceived by Clelia Coussonnet and Missla Libsekal, it focuses on women artists operating within Francophone and Lusophone Africa. Read more articles in the series here. What is holding back the agency of women? Can we name the forces erasing or hampering women’s full participation in public...

Multi-layered Selves: Colonialism, Decolonization and Counter-Intuitive Learning Spaces

Vanessa de Oliveira Andreotti, Vancouver 

As I wondered about the best way to write this text, two related events caught my attention. First, I received a call for publications with the title “After De-colonizing…What?” issued after an extremely productive (albeit difficult) 2015 gathering in Portugal on the theme of ‘Eco-versities’. In the same week, in a different context, I was gifted a wooden USB stick...

Solange Farkas: Video Art Finds a Home in Brasil

Lee Ann Norman, Chicago & New York City 

Since the first edition of the Videobrasil festival, a festival dedicated to video art and artists, the organization Associação Cultural Videobrasil, which was formally established as a nonprofit by Solange Farkas in 1991, has been working to provide a platform for video artists to address issues of the Global South and to offer an entry point for audiences to engage...

In/Visible Series: Is there cooperation amongst women?

Another Africa, Vancouver 

In spring 2016, Another Africa launched In/Visible Voices of Women, a long-term publication project. Conceived by Clelia Coussonnet and Missla Libsekal, it focuses on women artists operating within Francophone and Lusophone Africa. Read more articles in the series here. What is holding back the agency of women? Can we name the forces erasing or hampering women’s full participation in public...

Heritage Hall aglow

All We Have is Each Other

Alissa Firth-Eagland, Guelph, Ontario 

All We Have is Each Other[i] The path across diversity needs to be re-imagined and re-constructed constantly.[ii] The key to this re-imagination and re-construction is in working together, but this work can only truly begin in an equitable, co-creative, and mutual way when we settlers let go of our fears. Fears rule us: fears of being unseated from power, disquieted...

The Gang and the Government

Niki Singleton, New York City 

This comic started with an unexpected experience I had going to a Jane’s Addiction concert in Port Chester, NY a couple of months ago. The police presence at the concert was extremely intense, and the anxiety in the crowd over security was really high. My friends and I tried to get to a place on the concert floor where we could...

In/Visible Series: What needs to change to make people feel like contemporary art is theirs too?

Another Africa, Vancouver 

In spring 2016, Another Africa launched In/Visible Voices of Women, a long-term publication project. Conceived by Clelia Coussonnet and Missla Libsekal, it focuses on women artists operating within Francophone and Lusophone Africa. Read more articles in the series here. Probing the possibilities of contemporary art, ultimately is a way for us to reflect on how our societies are constituted. We...

In/Visible Series: What have been the setbacks, and breakthroughs in the last decade?

Another Africa, Vancouver 

In spring 2016, Another Africa launched In/Visible Voices of Women, a long-term publication project. Conceived by Clelia Coussonnet and Missla Libsekal, it focuses on women artists operating within Francophone and Lusophone Africa. Read more articles in the series here. What is holding back the agency of women today? Can we name the forces erasing or hampering women’s full participation in...

In/Visible Series: Are There Still Spaces and Places Where Women are not Welcome?

Another Africa, Vancouver 

In spring 2016, Another Africa launched In/Visible Voices of Women, a long-term publication project. Conceived by Clelia Coussonnet and Missla Libsekal, it focuses on women artists operating within Francophone and Lusophone Africa. Read more articles in the series here. What is holding back the agency of women today? Can we name the forces erasing or hampering women’s full participation in...

The Rivers Have Called Upon Us

Niki Singleton, New York City 

As I was reading Musagetes’ Manifesto on Economic Dignity and getting all passionate about activism, the usual disturbing and stressful noise from the construction of a new ferry pier next to the construction site of another huge tower on the East River in New York City started up. The new pier will transport thousands of people back and forth, swarming...

Skin the City

Paula Segal, New York City 
Daniel Eizirik, Porto Allegre, Brazil 

The skin of the city shifts. Waves of residents come and go; meanings vanish. The longer I live here, the more I feel like I am a creature of many phantom limbs. Hungry, I walk to Jimmy’s hoping for fish and a chair to eat it in, but it is gone. In its place, a bodega expanded into a head...

There’s So Much Giant Single-Word Public Artwork in New York City

Michael Anthony Farley, Baltimore 

Next month, Public Art Fund is installing Martin Creed’s “Understanding,” a 50-foot rotating neon sign, on Brooklyn’s Pier Six. That’s about a 20 minute walk through the Brooklyn Bridge Park Greenway from “OY/YO,” the popular public sculpture from Deborah Kass that’s on view until August. Which got us thinking: why do New Yorkers love one-word giant public text sculptures so...

The American Dream Project

Charles Bernstein, New York City  

We’re melting. We, the people of the United States, who 230 years ago dreamed of forming a more perfect union. The American Dream is of a people who are decent, hard working, caring, generous, fair, democratic, without prejudice. In 2016, all those ideals seem like a pool of water on the outhouse floor. Did we ever really have the dream...

America’s Selfie Moment is Actually Mine

Edwin Torres, New York City 

How iconoclastically mundane to claim a dream for a nation — we are all in each other’s dream, whether asleep or not. I think of the alliteration, the sprung rhythm inside the phrase “American Dream.” There’s a hum to the machinery flowing underneath its sub-textual roll in the mouth, a tease for tongue and glory. Another country’s name just doesn’t...

In/Visible Series: What are the most pressing issues facing women, and women practitioners today?

Another Africa, Vancouver 

In spring 2016, Another Africa launched In/Visible Voices of Women, a long-term publication project. Conceived by Clelia Coussonnet and Missla Libsekal, it focuses on women artists operating within Francophone and Lusophone Africa. Read more articles in the series here. We asked 11 phenomenal women — intrepid academics, artists, writers, and curators — to join us for the 6-part Commentary Series...

In/Visible Voices of Women: A Commentary Series

Another Africa, Vancouver 

This summer ArtsEverywhere will republish “In/Visible Voices of Women,” a series conceived by Clelia Coussonnet and Missla Libsekal, which first appeared on Another Africa. The essays and commentary look to women practitioners to explore, through their poetic voices, what is particular to this epoch of women working in the arts.  Meritocracy within the art world, however idealised, has not yet materialised. The marginalisation of voices such as...

Torpor and Awakening

Vanessa de Oliveira Andreotti, Vancouver 

This text is an adapted transcript of a keynote presented at the Indigenous Scholars Conference: Indigenous Epistemologies: Re-Visioning Reconciliation on 26 March 2015, at the University of Alberta. It has been accepted for publication in the Canadian Journal of Native Studies. I am from a family with Indigenous Latin American and German ancestry. I have been to many different countries...

Giardino Ammirato: re-imagining public space at the Spring Session of Free Home University

Alessandra Pomarico, New York City & Lecce, Italy 

The 2016 Spring Session of Free Home University started with a desire to take care of the public garden adjacent to the Ammirato Culture House, a hub for artistic social practices and a sister initiative of Free Home University, which inhabits the space during its seasonal “unclasses.” The adjacent garden—the ‘garden with no name at the crossroads of two streets’—has...

From the Editors: What is the first sound from the future?

Shawn Van Sluys, Guelph, Ontario 

When Musagetes conceptualized ArtsEverywhere in early 2015, we determined that many voices must be present side-by-side across all of the issues and themes that intersect throughout the online platform. (Read here about the themes of ArtsEverywhere.) We wanted ArtsEverywhere not only to feature the ideas and insights of artists and cultural workers, but also those of policy makers, educators, scientists,...

Alternative Institutions and Intimate Counter-Publics: Chto Delat’s School for Engaged Art and Rosa’s House of Culture

Jonathan Brooks Platt, Pittsburgh 

The following essay is the first in a monthly series on pedagogy, edited by Alessandra Pomarico, co-curator of the Free Home University in Lecce, Italy. Alessandra introduces the series here. In the context of contemporary Russian artistic and intellectual life, the significance of the Chto Delat School for Engaged Art and Rosa’s House of Culture is difficult to overstate. Since...

Formes pour vivre: An Experiment in Ecological-Environmental-Scientific Poetics

Karen Houle, Guelph, Ontario 

In this short essay my aim is modest and two-fold. First, I would like to share with you a story about an experiment in ecological-environmental-scientific-poetics that worked out beautifully. It worked so well that I believe it is worth sharing. Second, in the spirit of sharing, so that others can try out this recipe, I will make explicit the elements of...

Acting Locally: How Artists Can Shape the Nature of Change in their Communities

Lee Ann Norman, Chicago & New York City 

Two young women carefully balance freshly packed artworks as they embrace their hosts and exit a small bungalow just off the boulevard. They are in town from St. Louis, having recently closed their exhibition at THE FRANKLIN, an artist-run project space and curatorial lab on Chicago’s west side. The structure — a 12’ x 12’ wooden cube with custom designed...

Improvising Freely: The ABCs of an Experience

Lê Quan Ninh, Saint-Silvain-sous-Toulx, France 
Karen Houle, Guelph, Ontario 

The following text is excerpted from Lê Quan Ninh’s book, Improvising Freely: The ABCs of an Experience, translated from the French by Karen Houle with assistance from Pegleess Barrios & Melissa Chong Ah Yan. The book is available for purchase from PS Guelph (www.publicationstudio.biz). Abécédaire (An ABC) This book is an attempt to describe my own experience as an improviser and...

Improvisation & Policy: Notes for a Roundtable

Daniel Weinstock, Montreal 

A Roundtable on Improvisation & Policy will be convened by ArtsEverywhere, Musagetes, and the International Institute for Critical Studies in Improvisation (IICSI) on May 7, 2016. The roundtable will consider the following two questions: How can policies be created to shape & enable environments conducive to improvisation (or improvisatory methodologies) in the enactment of collective daily life, civic relations, and social struggle? How can...

Decolonization, Reconciliation, and the Extra-Rational Potential of the Arts

cheyanne turions, Toronto 

On 11 June 2008, the gravity of a state-sponsored process that began more than 120 years earlier was finally acknowledged in the Canadian House of Commons. Inside the chamber, settler leaders of the country’s four main political parties had gathered together with Indigenous[1] community members to offer an apology for the Canadian Indian residential school system, thus marking the Canadian...

Come on, don’t be so white!

Elisabeth Wellershaus, Berlin 

Rebelling against old thought patterns and stereotypes is a survival strategy for many artists of African heritage. And Europe still has a lot to learn in this respect. A sunny afternoon in Soweto’s southwest. Albert Ibokwe Khoza is facing me, standing very close, and he’s naked. Naked and obviously furious. He has only just burned a few dried leaves and...

Up From the Basement: The Artist and the Making of the Just City

Theaster Gates, Chicago 

Governance, despite its own hopes for a universality of exclusion, is for the inducted, for those who know how to articulate interests disinterestedly, those who vote and know why they vote (not because someone is black or female but because he or she is smart), who have opinions and want to be taken seriously by serious people. In the mean...

Social Practice Artwork: A Restaurant and Garden Serving up Connections to Urban Nature

Patrick Lydon, San Jose & Seoul 

Can an urban garden help us remember what it means to be human? Three months ago, we opened a slightly audacious restaurant and garden in a working-class suburb of Osaka, Japan with the intent of connecting people more deeply with food and nature in their neighborhood. Experimental and temporary in nature, the project was approached not as a business or...

Sex of the Oppressed

Nikolay Oleynikov, St. Petersburg 

Sex of the Oppressed was first published in Russian by the Marxist Free Press (2013). What follows is the author’s Foreword to the book. The English translation by Jonathan Brooks Platt will be available in early April 2016 by its Canadian publisher, PS Guelph (www.publicationstudio.biz), and by its German publisher, Archive Books (www.archivebooks.org).   Sex is always located between oppression...

Uno specchio per cinque (A mirror for five) — a serial story

Lu Cafausu, Italy 

Uno specchio per cinque (A mirror for five) is the title of a series of five episodes of a story conceived and written by the artist group Lu Cafausu as if it were the script of a film for which the five members are the collective director. Each episode’s narrative is based on the themes of Lu Cafausu’s research: reflections...

Why Design Matters

Jason Schupbach, Washington  

My vision for a just city is one where design and its power as a tool against inequality is leveraged for the benefit of all residents. As the director of design programs at the National Endowment for Arts, and one of the U.S. government’s primary advocates for good design, I spend a lot of time with mayors and other leaders...

Creative Place-Making—This is The Nature of Graffiti

David Maddox, New York City 
Pippin Anderson, Cape Town 
Paul Downtown, Adelaide 
Emilio Fantin, Milan 
Germán Gómez Eslava, Bogotá 
Todd Lanier Lester, São Paulo 
Patrick Lydon, San Jose & Seoul 
Patrice Milillo, Los Angeles 
Laura Shillington, Managua & Montreal 
Mike Houck, Portland 
Julie Goodness, Stockholm 

Nature is all around us. Plants, animals, soil, air and water inhabit and animate our daily lives, whether you live in the country or in the city. We are invigorated by nature. We are inspired by its creatures, their beauty, and their existential meaning. We depend on nature’s services and what they provide. We long for connection to nature, whether...

Gracefully Post-Human?

cheyanne turions, Toronto 

Paradigm shift is not the evacuation of power, but rather its redistribution. Speaking at the University of Toronto in early February, feminist scholar Rosi Braidotti speculated on the impotence of the classical humanities to explain the entwined nature of contemporary life, offering instead the post-humanities as an intellectual paradigm worthy of the times. She calls the method cartographic, implying an...

The Spirit of All Over the Map

Hilary Hung, Guelph 

If a community is a safe haven from a world where people are ordinarily crushed and diminished into spectators as Paulo Freire wrote in Education for Critical Consciousness (1973),[i] then I have a story to tell. It will be awkward and imperfect, without beginning, middle and end. But what else is to be expected of a story told from the...

Urban Encounters with Curatorial Collective Aisle 4

Jessica Hein, Toronto 

The built city shifts from being an articulation of zones and maps and blueprints to something that has tone, tempo, and flavour when its inhabitants step out of their doors, enter the streets, and make their paths through the unfolding of daily life. A community’s network of paths forms a constantly evolving story that is specific to each neighbourhood. These...

Parade of Noises

Jessica Hein, Toronto 

Rich Marsella’s music practice embraces wild sounds and elements of chaos. As an avant garde musician and composer, music gets exciting for him when noise is introduced into musical compositions that resonate with an audience. By exploring sounds that many of us perceive as ugly alongside those we recognize as beautiful, he invites us to wake up our ears and...

Resilience Theory, from the Sciences to the Arts

cheyanne turions, Toronto 

While resilience is a quality that can be ascribed to the toughest amongst us, resilience theory is slightly different, an idea that comes from the sciences to describe a system’s capacity to respond to change while maintaining core functions. Unsurprisingly, the character trait and the systems model share something in common—that ability to withstand forces and emerge recognizable on the...